MANY RELIGIONS, DIFFERENT CULTURES – ONE RELIGIOUS EDUCATION? YOUNG PEOPLE’S PERCEPTIONS OF RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION: A CHALLENGE FOR NEW CONCEPTIONS

Fred-Ole/Wolfram Sandt / Weisse

Abstract


In Hamburg you will not find a class whose pupils are homogeneously German and certainly not with a uniform Christian, in particular Protestant-Lutheran background.  Two processes have had their influence on school: The drastic decrease in church membership in the last 20 years and the emergence of a plurality of religions which is mainly the result of immigration.  Due to this, there are many children in the schools of our city who have only a weak tie to the traditional forms of Christianity or no tie at all. There is also a significant number of children who belong to other religions, primarily – but not exclusively to Islam.  Furthermore, those who consider themselves as religiously committed cannot be looked upon as a homogenous group with regard to their adherence to one of the major religions.


Keywords


Religious Education; Hamburg

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/55-0-1552

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help