BLACK THEOLOGY OF SOUTH AFRICA AND THE LIBERATION PARADIGM

FH Chimhanda

Abstract



Historically, Black Theology of South Africa, in dialogue with Black Theology of North
America, emerged in answer to the problem of apartheid. It was thus situational, regional,
liberational and relevant. The apparent dormancy of Black Theology in post-independent
South Africa raises questions concerning the liberation agenda in South Africa itself, the
rest of Africa and the whole world. The main question is: Has the liberation task been
completed? This article explores liberation as an ongoing historical process. Furthermore,
the liberation paradigm is seen as multifaceted. In this perspective, liberation is in dialogue
with reconciliation, restitution and empowerment of the marginalised. Black Theology then,
in dialogue with post-independent Africa, not only has to jealously guard against its hard
won liberation from apartheid, but also, needs to be creative and proactive in identifying
new needs and in mapping out possible solutions.

Keywords


Black Theology of South Africa, Liberation Paradigm, Liberation Agenda, Post-Apartheid and Post-colonial Africa, Dialogical Nature Of Liberation

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/105-0-163

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

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