BLACK THEOLOGY: FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS OR A QUANTUM LEAP TOWARDS RESUSCITATION

Jennifer Slater

Abstract



Black theology traditionally presented itself, implicitly or explicitly, as an instrument for
black liberation. Its proverbial silence since 1994 in South Africa raises the question
whether Black Theology should be left to die a natural death, or be resuscitated. This
article proposes to measure the functionality of Black Theology within the context and
culture of the �new� South Africa. By so doing it will try to rescue Black Theology from its
perceived dormant state as well as unravelling its current status as a theological and
academic conundrum. It wishes to look at reformulating a tentative set of interpretive
principles, which would serve as guidelines for validating Black Theology once again as a
functional theological discipline among other credible theological disciplines. The
appraisal of Black Theology will be done against its own historical strengths and
weaknesses; against its own criteria as a �hands on� theology embedded within the Christian
tradition. It will ascertain whether its raison d��tre can be rekindled to a renewed
appropriateness.

Keywords


Black Theology, Ecological Justice, Homophobia, Liberation, Victim-Mind-Set, Xenophobia

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/105-0-164

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

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