STORYTELLING AS AN INDIGENOUS RESOURCE IN THE INTERPRETATION OF OLD TESTAMENT ETHICS AND RELIGION

Funlola Olojede

Abstract


 

This article shows that indigenous resources could serve as a complementary mode of enriching and expanding existing discourses in knowledge production and use, especially in Old Testament interpretation. Specifically, it argues that, as an indigenous resource, storytelling could be employed as a powerful tool in the interpretation of Old Testament ethics. This is because Old Testament ethics itself is rooted principally in story and because storytelling is universal, it offers a medium to which everyday people can easily relate. Because interpretive parallels abound between indigenous African stories and Old Testament narratives, on an ethical level, these stories could be explored for their hermeneutical value.


Keywords


Indigenous Knowledge; Storytelling; Old Testament Ethics

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/113-0-919

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


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