‘LET EVERYONE BE SUBJECT TO GOVERNING AUTHORITIES’: THE INTERPRETATION OF NEW TESTAMENT POLITICAL ETHICS TOWARDS AND AFTER ZIMBABWE’S 2002 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS

Lovemore Togarasei

Abstract


This article is aimed at analyzing the way New Testament political ethics were
interpreted by Christians towards and after Zimbabwe’s 2002 Presidential elections.
The research focused on the debates, by Christians, I observed and sometimes
participated in. In the first section I give a brief background of the political situation
in Zimbabwe before and after Zimbabwe’s 2002 Presidential elections. This section
is followed by a historical-critical interpretation of New Testament passages on
political ethics. The third section looks at the pro-ruling party interpretation of the
political ethics followed by the anti-ruling party interpretation. The last section is a
theological reflection on these ethics in the context they were used in Zimbabwe.

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/85-0-937

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help