RELIGIOSITY IN SOUTH AFRICA: TRENDS AMONG THE PUBLIC AND ELITES

Hennie Kotzé, Reinet Loubser

Abstract


 This article uses statistical data from the World Values Survey (WVS) and the South African Opinion Leader Survey to examine religiosity among the following samples of South Africans: Afrikaans, English, isiXhosa and isiZulu speaking Protestants, Catholics, African Independent Church (AIC) members and non-religious people (public and parliamentarians). We find that mainline Protestant churches have suffered a loss of members, thus changing the denominational face of the country. Additionally, although South Africans remain very religious, the importance of God in their lives has declined. For many people God is now less important although not unimportant. Parliamentarians appear unaffected by these changes: God is still highly important to members of parliament who profess Christianity (the majority). However, the small number of parliamentarians who are not religious now think God is unimportant.


Keywords


South Africa; Religiosity; Secularisation; Christianity; Values

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7833/116-1-1287

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.


ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

 Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help