GM FOOD AND COLLECTIVE SIN: CHRISTIAN THEOLOGICAL ETHICAL REFLECTION

Manitza Kotzé

Abstract


 While there are various ethical concerns that are raised in terms of genetically modified (GM) food, there seems to be excellent arguments both for and against most of them. In this article I will argue that ethical concern over the possible destructive socio-economic effects is, however, the area where Christian theological ethics may make the most meaningful contribution. This may also be expressed as the notion of collective sin. An understanding of sin as collective, a mutual situation that we all share and that not only refers to individuals transgressions, but also the very structures and systems that make up our world is particularly helpful in discussing GM food through the lenses of a doctrine of sin. This notion also underlines the socio-economic dangers, where large corporations hold a virtual monopoly over the production and selling of GM food, understanding power as "power over" and domination. The article intends to reflect on this understanding and how it may add value to the larger discussions on the ethical concerns surrounding GM food.


Keywords


Bioethics; Doctrine of Sin; Eucharist; Genetic Engineering; GMOs; Power

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/115-0-1288

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help