‘THE TIME OF NO ROOM’: TOWARDS A THEOLOGICAL CRITIQUE OF CONTEMPORARY ATTEMPTS AT EARTH MANAGEMENT

Daniel P. Castillo

Abstract


This essay offers a theological critique of contemporary attempts to economically price the earth. It does so by drawing an analogy between pricing and the biblical act of ‘naming.’ In particular, this essay considers two forms of naming found in scripture: 1) the human person’s task of naming the animals, as described in Gen. 2:19; and 2) the work of ‘name-taking’ via census (here I focus especially on the Lukan account’s reference to the Roman imperial census).The rationality underlying each of these forms of naming is examined leading to the conclusion that the act of naming in Genesis is shaped by the desire to serve that which is named, while the act of naming in Luke is shaped by the desire to press that which is named into service. The essay concludes by arguing that the dominant regime of pricing and earth management bears a strong resemblance to the dominative logic that characterizes the Roman imperial census.

 

doi: 10.7833/111-1-11


Keywords


Eco-theology; Environmental Ethics; Hermeneutics; Economics; Naming; Census; Gen. 2:19

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/111-0-13

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help