INDIGENOUS BELIEFS AND PRACTICES IN ECOSYSTEM CONSERVATION: RESPONSE OF THE CHURCH

Yaw Adu-Gyamfi

Abstract


The Akan people of Ghana’s beliefs and practices, enforced by taboos regarding ecosystem
conservation, foster a sustainable use of the environment. Akan beliefs and practices
highlight their moral import, are crucial in preserving the environment, and protect water
sources, the natural vegetation and wildlife and endangered nonhuman species. However,
the church has not taken the indigenous beliefs, practices and taboos seriously. The decline
of these has led to the degradation of the Ghanaian environment. This article aims at
drawing the church’s attention by arguing that the indigenous beliefs and practices are
more earth-friendly and consistent with biodiversity than modern or Western ways of life
and that they represent the best chance for successful ecological practices that enhance
ecosystem conservation.

Keywords


Indigenous; Environment; Taboos; Church

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/107-0-132

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

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