MEAT, MUSCLE AND MIND: DIOGENES AND THE ATHLETES

Philip R. Bosman

Abstract


The ancient Cynics occupy a unique place in Hellenistic thought for the physicality
of their self-representation. On the one hand, Diogenes is depicted accusing
philosophers, in particular Plato, of idle talk, himself advocating double training
(mental and bodily), and performing his philosophy through acts of “street theatre”
in various public spaces. On the other hand, he derides athletes and the folly of
those following them to athletic festivals. While the two directions of criticism differ
in aim and scope, they must be viewed in tandem to establish the Cynic view of the
body.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/90-0-1056

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

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