LEGISLATING FOR JUSTICE - THE SOCIAL LEGISLATION OF THE COVENANT CODE AND DEUTERONOMY

Gunther H Wittenberg

Abstract


This paper strives to show that the basic concerns and social legislation of the deuteronomic movement can serve as a helpful model for the South African process of reconstruction and reform. Starting point is a consideration of the Book of the Covenant. Following Halbe and Crusemann the author claims that the document has to be dated to the late eighth, early seventh centuries.  Two sources have been used by a redactor, Exodus 34:11-26, identified as a document of the resistance Yahweh-alone movement of the Northern Kingdom, and Exodus 21f, the law of the ruling class in Judah.  In the dark years after the destruction of Samaria both groups combined and embarked on a process of reform with the intention of establishing greater justice, especially for the deprived and oppressed rural community.  This process of reform is traced with regard to specific examples in the Book of the Covenant and in Deuteronomy.

Keywords


Book of the Covenant; Deuteronomy; Halbe; Crusemann

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/54-0-1482

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


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