NGURUNDERI AND THE MURRAY COD: GLIMPSES INTO AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND COSMOLOGY FROM A WHITE FELLA’S VIEWPOINT

David Reichardt

Abstract


Lynn White Jr., a progenitor of eco-theology, wrote that “What people do about their ecology depends on what they think about themselves in relation to things around them. Human ecology is deeply conditioned by beliefs about our nature and destiny – that is, by religion.”1 In Australia’s Murray-Darling Basin the contrast between what European settler society is ‘doing about its ecology’, and what the Aboriginal society it supplanted did is so striking, and the ecological damage being done currently so serious as to stimulate theological reflection on Aboriginal anthropology, cosmology and eco-praxis. This paper offers insights into the first two of these areas from a ‘white fella’s’ point of view. The insights are tentative, because the differences in worldview between Australia’s ‘first’ and ‘second’ peoples are vast and still not fully appreciated. They are offered in hopes of continuing the ‘greening’2 of Christian theology, one of eco-theology’s most important functions.

 

doi: 10.7833/111-1-18


Keywords


Aboriginal; Indigenous; Spirituality; Murray-Darling Basin; Eco-theology

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/111-0-18

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help