COMMUNITY IN CHRISTIAN ETHICS AND AFRICAN CULTURE

Neville Richardson

Abstract


Introduction
Geologists describe a river as 'old' when it has interacted with the surrounding landscape
to the extent that a state of benign symbiosis has been achieved. The adjacent land is usually
a flat plain across which the river wanders, often rather sluggishly. By contrast, a 'new river'
has a far more dramatic relationship with its geological environment. The landscape is rugged
and the river plunges in churning torrents through rocky ravines, and over roaring waterfalls.
There is noise, there is spectacle. River and landscape wrestle with one another and much
energy is spent over the millennia until, at some distant future time, a state of harmonious if
somewhat dull coexistence is reached.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/62-0-628

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ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

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