RELIGIOUS INTERSECTIONS IN AFRICAN CHRISTIANITY: THE CONVERSION DILEMMA AMONG INDIGENOUS CONVERTS

Joel Mokhoathi

Abstract


The conversion of indigenous converts to Christianity is often perceived as a linear process, which marks individuals’ rebirth and assumption of a new identity as they are assimilated into the Christian fold. This simplistic view, however, seems to undermine the intrinsic technicalities that are involved in the process of conversion, particularly for indigenous converts who already embrace a unique worldview, which is different from and sometimes contradictory to the conservative Christian outlook. This paper uses a qualitative research approach in the form of document analysis to critically explore the religious intersectionalities between Christianity and African Traditional Religion (ATR), and discusses some dilemmas that are inherent in the conversion of indigenous converts. It concludes by suggesting a paradigmatic model for re-viewing and re-interpreting the coming together of Christianity and African Traditional Religion in Africa south of the Sahara, particularly in South Africa.


Keywords


African Christianity; African Traditional Religion; Conversion; Indigenous converts; Hybridity

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7833/119-1-1686

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2305-445X (online); ISSN 0254-1807 (print)

Attribution CC BY-NC-ND 4.0


Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2013.


Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help